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This Week's Editorial
Extension Corner PDF Print E-mail
Written by Tracy Trumper, CSU Extension agent   

Principles of home canning

Home canning is making a come-back because of the concern for the nutritional value of foods consumers are buying.

Consumers are concerned about foods being unprocessed, non-GMO, natural, whole foods. Because foods start to lose their vitamin content once they are harvested — and store-bought canned foods will lose valuable vitamins from the heating process and from sitting for periods of time — home canning fresh, home-grown foods has its advantages.

According to the USDA’s Complete Guide to Home Canning, “If vegetables are handled properly and canned promptly after harvest, they can be more nutritious than fresh produce sold in local stores.” When the food you are starting with is of poor quality, when the jars fail to seal, when the food spoils and when flavors, texture, color and nutrients deteriorate during prolonged storage, the advantage of home canning is diminished. However, if you understand the principles behind home canning, the process and result can be very rewarding and a source of pride for the canner.

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise August 27, 2015

 
It's the Pitts PDF Print E-mail
Written by Lee Pitts   

Then and now

I’m starting to feel older than dirt, and I swear there is soil in our garden that I knew when it was rocks. Oh, how a few decades can change your outlook on life.

At age 25 ... “Sure I can ride that horse. Haven’t you got anything tougher than that?”

At age 70 ... “I’d sure like to take a swing at that old reprobate, but I have two knees made from titanium, an artificial hip and I’ve somehow developed a fear of flying.”

At 25 ... “I wish those old fogies in front of me would get out of my way! They’re only going 75. Can’t they see I’m in a hurry?”

At 70 ... “I wish those cars backed up behind me would get off my tail and quit honking. Can’t they see I’m going as fast as I can.” To which my wife replies, “Honey, you’re doing 35 in a 65.”

At 25 ... At the Hatch, N.M., Chili Festival, you tell a vendor, “Give me the hottest peppers you got. There’s never been a pepper made that was too hot for me.”

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise August 27, 2015